We build it, they give it away and ask us to pick up the pieces

We live in a mad world, ladies and gents, a mad world.

Chomsky Privatisation

The one and only hospital in the UK that was privatised has just gone bankrupt and now WE have to foot the £10 million bill to save it. A typical story of how the public pay for and build proud institutions, only for the government to give it away for next to nothing and have us pay for it again when the said private firm (who usually shares close relations with whichever puppet we have in government) screws it up. We let this happen time and again and let our governments get away with it. We really are suffering a form of Stockholm syndrome. Noam Chomsky has long said that defunding and creating a panic is the best way to privatisation for the corporate shills we have running the establishment today and that is what we are seeing on a grand scale with the NHS.

Circle Healthcare have claimed to save the public money overall, despite leaving a £7-12 million deficit and remain intransigent on their belief that they have completed a good job, citing a changing landscape for the reasons to pull out. The issue of people being able to profit from the health and wellbeing of the population is glossed over by these profiteers.

Hopefully the public will see through the often repeated “free at the point of entry” rhetoric spouted out by our politicians and demand that it stays in full public ownership.

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Occupy: The philosophy of we won’t go home

Philosophy of occupy
Noam Chomsky on pressure and protest

“The philosophy of Occupy scares them (the government) the philosophy of we will not go home!” The Artist Taxi Driver at the last nights assembly at Parliament Square where a group of humans have been occupying land in a visceral demonstration of how democracy isn’t working in the UK.

This week we have seen the UK position itself just to the right of China, with its rules, regulations and byelaws that are impeding people’s rights to protest and hold corporate state to account. At Occupy Democracy (now dubbed the #TarpaulinRevolution as police ripped up the groundsheets people were sat on in the rain from under them earlier this week) the private enforcement group of ‘Red Caps’ have even found a bylaw which prevents someone from playing an acoustic guitar which was not the  Live Music Act 2012 and made their feelings known as those playing renditions of hallelujah receiving some hard words being served notices.No acoustic guitars allowed

Police Privatisation

Watching Boris Johnson’s private security firms give orders to the police we pay to protect us was a very sobering site. A piece of string attached to a sign and a bag to stop it blowing away was deemed to be a structure and so the red caps ordered its removal for believing it to be against the law, holding lengthy discussions with the MET Police about removing it. A woman was disturbed by the corporate mouth pieces for looking as though she was sleeping in a position of comfort under a tree, another law broken. One child no older than 3 started kicking a ball which hit a police officer by the fence which has been erected around both Winston Churchill and Parliament Square, I wondered whether there was a bylaw for this too and warned him so as I scooted passed on my way home.

We now live in a county that claims to have great freedoms of speech, expression and beliefs and yet a country with as chequered a history as China for those very things is seemingly more tolerant of the sight of sleeping bags on their streets or a tarpaulin to keep the rain off your head. They have even allowed tents.

Protestors have the luxury of a tent 'structure'
Protestors have the luxury of a tent ‘structure’

The size of the problem can be reflected in the comparative coverage in our news. Every day for the past few weeks the Occupy Hong Kong story has featured countless times online and in print news, yet a demonstration of equal importance in our own backyard has gone mainly unnoticed by our media as the image below shows.  The upside is that there are people there on the ground covering events as they unfold in real-time. There used to be a time when the mainstream media was accessed to verify news on the social media, today it is very much the other way.

Disparity UK
Disparity UK

Each day at Occupy Democracy has had a different theme and a selection of fine speakers, not least Russell Brand and Ken Loach as well as Vivienne Westwood and Caroline Lucas MP to date. If you are passing through the smoke before Sunday you would do worse than to stop by and catch a flavour of what is being discussed; it is peaceful, colourful and educational. Even if you were not planning to head to London, make the exception and catch the final day on Sunday.

You can visit the Occupy Democracy website for daily themes, schedules and updates and if you want to see what Russell Brand had to say about the right to protest you can see him on last nights Newsnight https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=VqsFp0J22Hc

Fascism: a very, very short introduction

boot stamping on a human face forever

This week confirmed what many had known for a long time; that the perpetual message of hatred, fear and mistrust by the media and our politicians has seeped into the psyche of the wider public. Tell the lie often enough and keep it simple enough and eventually we will believe it.

The local elections and European Parliament elections this week have been preceded by endless debate around the viability and validity of UKIP as a party political group. Our state broadcaster has given wall to wall coverage for one group, one individual over all others and have a history of favouring one type of speech over another. Why has there been no comparative in-depth look at the relative surge in support for the Green Party? UKIP have been championed for their earthquake victory and we watch as the last remnants of a broken democracy is washed down the gutter to the sound of thunderous applause.

There has been much written about the history of fascism and politics but one book on both aspects, ‘A Very Short Introduction to Fascism’ by Kevin Passmore, hits the nail on the head when it said:

“It was held that when pressure from the proletariat for the destruction of capitalism rose to extreme proportions, capitalists resorted to terror to defend their control over the means of production. For the Communist International, the current crisis of capitalism was so serious that a conventional dictatorship was inadequate, therefore capitalists used the mass fascist movement to destroy socialism. According to 1935 definition, fascism was not the creation of the capitalists, for it recruited from the petty bourgeoisie (lower middle-class), which had real grievances against the big capital. Nevertheless, capitalists were able to persuade the perpetually perplexed petty bourgeoisie that it’s interests lay in defending the property against socialism. Once fascism was in power and the labour movement destroyed, capitalists no longer needed the fascist party and so it was again suppressed or marginalised.”

The past 6 years, following the recession and general election in 2010, has seen much unrest from the ‘left’ with strikes, endless marches and the like and we have witnessed an equal and opposite rise of the right in relation to this, first through the English Defence League and now UKIP. This is being replicated across Europe with Marie Le Pen leading a resurgent Front National in France. The worrying thing for us should be that the famously fascist BNP have seen their number of voters dwindle at the same time as the UKIP vote has risen. Farage won’t have it but his interview on LBC radio with James O’Brien recently exposed him for the intolerant hypocrite he really is and what UKIP is really all about.

We will now sit and see the rest of the mainstream parties rally further around this message of the far right to appease the middle ground, the firing gun started before these elections with one Tory MP agreeing with Farage’s comments about Romanian’s on trains and since the election George Osborne has said that he ‘respects’ Farage.

Finally from ‘A Very Short Introduction to Fascism’: 

“Fascism contends that a nationality should restore its domination or become dominant within a given state, and perhaps internationally too. Frequently fascists nationalism is that of the dominant ethnic group, or rather of a part of the dominant nationality which perceives itself, rightly or wrongly, to be neglected.

French thinker, Gustave Le Bon argued that irrational crowds were manipulated by charismatic leaders. Georges Sorel argued likewise that the masses were motivated by myths.”

The last two points reflect poorly on our current society. I think it was Noam Chomsky who said that the people you elect reflect upon the state of your society. We have had a buffoon in Boris Johnson as Mayor of London, a war criminal in Tony Blair as Prime Minister and now we have a fascist group gaining prominence that will now shape the future of the general election in 2015, as if the current parties were not fascist enough already. I had it argued against me recently that the current government were not fascist, which I would disagree with, if you look at some of the legislation that is being passed such as the Crime and Anti Social Behaviour Act, Tpims, the authorisation of water cannons and the GCHQ scandal etc but I could be wrong.

Some of us have said for a while that the next general election will be fought on immigration, fear, hatred and the EU, with results like this that much seems certain. Whoever gets in, we lose.

Malc-X-Democracy